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  • West Bengal

    1. Overview. 1
    2. Human rights violations by the security forces 2
    3. Violence against women. 3
    4. Violations of the rights of the child. 4
    5. Violations of the prisoners' rights 5
    6. Special Focus: Hunger and starvation deaths 6
    Denial of starvation deaths by the administration: 8


    1. Overview

    Ruled by the Communist Party of India (Marxist), West Bengal continued to be a state where hunger and starvation deaths were common. An independent Public Tribunal consisting of retired judges of different High Courts, physicians and social activists that investigated into the starvation deaths at Jalangi Subdivsion in Murshidabad district from 23-24 September 2005 found that “Starvation…. is rampant among men, women and children everywhere. No one is sure of his or her next meal”.[1] But the state government remained indifferent to the pitiful plight of the starving villagers of Jalangi, the workers in the tea gardens in North Bengal and tribals in Amlasol in West Midnapur district and elsewhere, who died of hunger and diseases. Majority villagers of Jalangi who were dying of hunger were even not recognized by the State as “below the poverty line” (BPL) families![2]

    The security forces were responsible for extrajudicial killings, including in custody, alleged encounters and in indiscriminate firing at protestors. The National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) of the Government of India recorded 7 deaths in police custody, and deaths of 8 civilians and injury to 21 civilians in police firing during 2005.[3] The NHRC had recorded 11 deaths in police custody, one death in the custody of the defence/para military forces and two deaths in encounter deaths during 2004-2005.[4]

    Torture was part of the administration. Nothing can be more demonstrative than the beating up of CPI (M) Member of Parliament Amitava Nandy and the personal assistant of former Chief Minister Jyoti Basu by the Rapid Action Force during the civic poll at Bidhannagar in Kolkata on 19 June 2005.[5] When even an honourable Member of Parliament was not spared, how can a common man feel safe at the hands of the police?

    The Maoists were responsible for violations of international humanitarian laws. On the night of 9 July 2005, the Maoists gunned down two CPI-M district leaders identified as Raghunath Murmu and Bablu Mudi at Majgeria village under Barikul police station in Bankura district.[6] On 8 October 2005, the Maoists killed Abdul Latif Mondal, a member of the CPM's Karimpur branch committee, at his residence at Fasilnagar in Thanerpara in Nadia district.[7]

    The condition of women in the state was deplorable with West Bengal contributing 7.6% to total cases of violence against women in India in 2005. The National Crime Records Bureau recorded 11,887 cases of violence against women in West Bengal during 2005, including 1,686 rape cases, 1,039 kidnapping cases and 446 dowry death cases.[8] The security forces were responsible for rape and molestation. Male policemen were deployed to control protests by women and they molested female protestors.[9] Women were branded as “witches” and killed by relatives to grab their property.

    The rights of the juveniles were blatantly violated by the police. On 27 October 2005, the police picked up 10-year-old Raja Kabiraj and detained him in Singur police station in Hooghly district after they failed to arrest Raja's father Mantu Kabiraj in connection with a robbery case.[10]

    The State Government of West Bengal sought to paint a rosy picture of the state of affairs of the jails in the state by renaming them as “Correctional Homes” with effect from 14 April 2000. Following a visit to Krishnagar district jail in Nadia, on 2 February 2005, West Bengal State Human Rights Commission chairman Shyamal Sen rued the Nadia administration for the “pathetic state” of the jail and the jail hospital.[11] The NHRC had recorded deaths of 64 persons in judicial custody in West Bengal during 2004-2005.[12]

    2. Human rights violations by the security forces

    Security forces were responsible for extrajudicial killings, including in custody, alleged encounters and in indiscriminate firing at protestors.  On 16 June 2005, Sunil Roy, a businessman, was found hanging from the ceiling of a Government Railway Police lock-up at Santragachhi railway station with his leather belt tied around the neck. The railway police claimed that the victim was arrested at the Santragachhi railway station on charges of pickpocket. But the family members rejected the allegation as “absurd” as the deceased had a flourishing business in the Howrah fish market. A case of unnatural death was registered and a magisterial inquiry was ordered into the death.[13]

    The security forces also killed people in alleged encounters. On 9 February 2005, an innocent villager Kadir Seikh was killed in an alleged encounter by the personnel of 63rd Battalion Border Security Force (BSF) at Sobhapur village under Vaisnabnagar police station in Malda, near the India-Bangladesh border. The BSF officials claimed that Kadir was found loitering suspiciously near the international border with a gang of five Bangladeshi smugglers, and that he was killed in retaliatory fire when the gang hurled bombs at the patrolling team. But the villagers refuted the BSF's claim. District superintendent of police Sashi Kant Poojari ordered an inquiry into the incident.[14]

    The security forces were also responsible for indiscriminate use of fire-arms against the protestors. On 4 August 2005, two persons were killed when police opened fire at the protestors near the Sub Divisional Officer office at Hemtabad in Raiganj in North Dinajpur district. The protestors were protesting the rape of a minor girl by unknown persons.[15]

    On 20 September 2005, two persons were killed in police firing at Khagrabari, near Coochbehar town. The Inspector General of Police (North Bengal) K L Meena said police fired when the activists of Greater Coochbehar Peoples Association tried to forcibly enter Siliguri town in a procession violating section 144 of CrPC.[16]

    Arbitrary arrest, detention and torture were common. On 14 December 2005, Vijay Kumar Jaiswal, son of late Uma Shankar Jaiswal, was illegally picked up by the police from his house at K.S. Path, Kharda in 24 Parganas (North) District without any arrest or search warrant. The police had actually come in search of Vijay Kumar Jaiswal's brother but not finding him at home, the police picked up Vijay Kumar Jaiswal and detained him for about 4 days at Kharda Police Station without any charge! He was tortured during illegal detention by Ashis Dutta, Assistant Sub Inspector and other police officers of Kharda Police Station. On 18 December 2005, Vijay Kumar Jaiswal was produced before the Sub Divisional Magistrate on fabricated charges.[17]

    3. Violence against women

    The security forces were responsible for rape and molestation. On 9 January 2005, Lance corporal R. C. Garai was arrested in connection with murder of Indira Sharma, wife of a Sikkim Armed Police constable. The victim's body was recovered from the unused septic tank at the defence cantonment at Burtuk on 7 January 2005.[18]

    On 3 May 2005, a woman identified as Kiranbala Das was allegedly shot dead by a jawan of 106th Battalion of the BSF identified as Pravin Kumar after arresting her at Ghojadanga near Bashirhat in North 24 Parganas district. The victim was shot in the abdomen and died at R.G. Kar Medical College and Hospital in Kolkata. According to BSF officials, the victim was arrested when she was running towards the border but was “accidentally” killed when she tried to escape from custody.[19] But the police stated that Pravin Kumar was drunk and tried to rape her when she went to the fields to feed goats. Hundreds of villagers attacked the BSF border outpost bordering Bangladesh in protest.[20]

    According to the BSF sources, the accused jawan was placed under suspension and a DIG-level inquiry was initiated to probe into the incident.[21]

    The police were responsible for indiscriminate use of force against women demonstrators. Male policemen were deployed to control female protestors and they allegedly molested female protestors. On 28 July 2005, at least seven nurses were badly injured in police lathi-charge when nurses under the aegis of Calcutta Nurses Action Forum tried to enter the Swastha Bhavan in Salt Lake, Kolkata to submit a memorandum to health department officers against their failure to fill several hundred vacancies for nurses in hospitals across the state. According to the Calcutta Nurses Action Forum Secretary, Rituparna Mahapatra, the male policemen also misbehaved with the nurses.[22]

    On 29 July 2005, police resorted to lathicharge on agitating women of Khanpur village, 32 km from Balurghat who were protesting against alleged police inaction in a molestation case. At least five women were injured, one of them critically.[23]

    Many women faced harassment while registering cases of domestic violence. In August 2005, Sakina Bibi lodged a complaint with the North 24-Parganas Superintendent of Police alleging that whenever she went to the police station, Sub-Inspector Sukesh Ranjan Pal at Haroa police station asked for sexual favours or bribe in return for police action against her husband.[24]

    “Witch hunting” was common in many tribal dominated areas of West Bengal. In many cases, women were branded witches and killed by relatives to grab their property.  The victims who were killed as witches included 60-year-old aunt, Lakshmi Murmu who was hacked to death at Kumodda village in Sagardighi in Murshidbad district on 5 June 2005 on the charges of being a witch;[25]  and a tribal couple – Soli Oraon and his wife Mungri – who were dragged to a nearby jungle and hacked to death by some villagers on 12 October 2005 after being suspected as “witches” for a wave of malarial fever at Mill Bagan tea estate in Darjeeling.[26]

    Many innocent women were tortured in the name of “witch hunting”. On 16 October 2005, Yoshodhara Devi was reportedly locked up by her neighbour Raj Kumar Mallick and his relatives at his residence at Kanchanpally in South Port police station area in Kolkata after an ‘ojha' (witch-doctor) held her responsible for the death of Mallick's child. However, Ajay Ranade, DC (Port), said that the matter was resolved ‘amicably' and no case was filed against the accused.[27]

    On 2 December 2005, a widow identified as Lakshmi Murmu was beaten up, locked up in a room and tried to be set on fire by a group of villagers led by her uncle Lippo who suspected her of being a witch at Bohar Mandirtala village near Memari, about 90 km from Calcutta. Earlier, an ojha (witchdoctor) had told Lakshmi's uncle Lippo that his daughter Pushpa was suffering from mental illness because of Lashmi's witchcraft influence.[28]

    4. Violations of the rights of the child

    The rights of the juveniles were blatantly violated by the police. On 27 October 2005, the police picked up 10-year-old Raja Kabiraj and detained him in Singur police station in Hooghly district after they failed to arrest Raja's father Mantu Kabiraj in connection with a robbery case.[29]

    On 22 December 2005, a police officer M.B. Khawash picked up Ramesh Tamang (14), a student of Class IX of Municipal Boys' High School, Darjeeling, without any cause when he was returning home along with eight others from Chandmari. Ramesh Tamang was taken to the police station and beaten up. The boy had to be admitted to Darjeeling Sadar Hospital after he suffered injuries on his leg due to the beating.[30]

    On 11 March 2005, Calcutta High Court directed the West Bengal Human Rights Commission to visit Liluah Rescue Home to investigate into alleged mismanagement and trafficking of girls by the authorities of the home for destitute. The direction was issued in response to a public interest litigation filed by advocate Tapas Kumar Bhanja, who accused the home employees of trafficking in girls. Tapas Kumar Bhanja alleged that some of the inmates had conceived during their stay at the home; but the authority, despite having knowledge of the fact, didn't take any action. He alleged that the state government had not implemented the earlier recommendations of the West Bengal Human Rights Commission submitted in 2000 following a direction from the High Court to submit a report on the state of affairs of the home.[31]

    Trafficking was rampant in West Bengal. On 4 September 2005, Chief Justice of Calcutta High Court V.S. Sirpurkar and the Justice Y.K. Sabharwal of Supreme Court of India expressed concern over the alarming rise in girl trafficking in Murshidabad while hearing the complaints from the victims of trafficking and their families at Behrampore, where they went as a part of a mobile court programme, an initiative to bring justice to the villages. As on 4 September 2005, only 23 cases of girl trafficking were recorded by the police in Murshidabad since January 2005. The victims and their family members alleged that the police often refused to register cases.[32]

    5. Violations of the prisoners' rights

    The NHRC registered deaths of 64 persons in judicial custody in West Bengal during 2004-2005.[33] Those who were killed in judicial custody in the State during 2005 included Prajit Das of Alipurduar Special Correctional Home who died on the way to the hospital on 8 March 2005,[34] Arunodoy Banerjee who died at the district hospital in Jalpaiguri on 8 July 2005,[35] and Bhagat Rajbangshi who died in Raiganj district jail in North Dinajpur district on 11 July 2005.[36] Bhagat Rajbhangshi fell ill while eating lunch. It was alleged that Bhagat was taken to the hospital only an hour after he choked while eating food. He was reportedly taken to hospital on a cycle rickshaw although the jail had an ambulance.[37]

    According to the State government, West Bengal 19,348 prisoners against the sanctioned capacity of 19,722 prisoners as of December 2005. Of the total prisoners, 74.6 % were under-trial prisoners (14,445). The population of female prisoners was 1,598 including 1,048 under-trials.[38]

    The State Government of West Bengal sought to paint a rosy picture of the state of affairs of the jails in the state by renaming them as “Correctional Homes” with effect from 14 April 2000. In the website of West Bengal prison, the state government claims - “All prisoners shall have three meals a day the early morning meal before the hour of labour, a mid day meal, and an evening meal before they are locked up for the night. Normally the prisoners are served adequate quantity of rice, lentil and vegetables in the lunch and chapatti, vegetables and lentil in the supper. Mutton and fish are served to them once every week. Tea is served twice daily”.[39]

    Following his visit to Krishnagar district jail in Nadia, on 2 February 2005, West Bengal State Human Rights Commission chairman Shyamal Sen criticized the Nadia administration for the “pathetic state” of the jail and the jail hospital. He found extreme overcrowding condition in the jail which housed 600 inmates in space insufficient for even 500. The inmates of the jail were being served “foul-smelling food” and they lived in “congested surroundings”. In the hospital, 14 patients, including infants, were sharing four beds. The jail hospital had a capacity of about 200 patients but the number of patients was three times higher. Sen described the Krishnagar district jail as the worst of all jails in the state.[40]

    6. Special Focus: Hunger and starvation deaths

    West Bengal, ruled by the Communist Party of India (Marxists) since 1977 faced widespread hunger and starvation deaths in 2005. The victims included the workers in the tea gardens in Jalpaiguri district of North Bengal, tribals in Amlashol in West Midnapur district and the villagers uprooted by land erosion by the Padma river in Malda and Murshidabad districts.

    The Supreme Court in its various interim orders in Writ Petition (civil) No. 196/2001 (PUCL Vs Government of India & Ors.) directed the government of India and the State governments/Union Territories to take steps to prevent hunger and starvation by identifying persons living Below Poverty Line (BPL) and making them beneficiaries of various poverty alleviation programmes of the government such as National Food For Work Programme. But the government of India and the State governments failed to effectively implement the Supreme Court orders.

    On 15 March 2005, opposition Congress and Trinamul Congress legislators walked out of the State Assembly of West Bengal in protest against the state government's “failure to stop starvation deaths” in different parts of the state.[41] In June 2005, the Supreme Court directed the West Bengal State Human Rights Commission to investigate into the alleged starvation deaths in Murshidabad district.[42]

    In Murshidabad district, “starvation deaths” were reported from Dayarampur, Udaynagar, Suryanagar and Paraspur villages of Jalangi block under Domkal Subdivsion. An independent Public Tribunal consisting of retired judges of different High Courts, physicians and social activists that investigated into the starvation deaths at Jalangi from 23-24 September 2005 found that “Starvation…. is rampant among men, women and children everywhere. No one is sure of his or her next meal”. The Public Tribunal revealed that the interim orders of the Supreme Court in Writ Petition 196/2001 had been blatantly violated. Despite widespread malnutrition, majority villagers of Jalangi had not been identified as being below the poverty line and poverty alleviation programmes had not been extended to them; the identification of beneficiaries for Antyodaya Anna Yojana had not been done; the villagers were deprived of work although Murshidabad district had been declared as a backward district under the National Food for Work Programme.[43] 

    A few families who were issued BPL ration cards did not get their rations properly as rice was not always available in the government designated ration shops. A few who got job under the National Food for Work Programme were not paid full wages. The workers were supposed to get five kilograms of rice and Rs 32 in cash but the CPI-M cadres deduct two rupees from each day's cash wage and 300 grams from the ration as donation to party fund.[44] On 2 April 2005, a 16-year-old girl identified as Rumpa Sharma hung herself from the roof of her mud house after three days of starvation at Dayarampur village in Murshidabad district.[45] On 9 September 2005, Hazrat Mollah died of starvation in Dayarampur village in Murshidabad district. He had been suffering from malnutrition for a long period of time.[46]

    The tribals in Amlashol of West Midnapore district were worst affected. Majority villagers of Amlashol, despite their acute poverty, were not enrolled as BPL families and only a few families had been listed under Annapurna Yojana. A few villagers had ration cards. The shop from which they were supposed to collect their rations was 35 kilometres away from the food storage. There was no medical facility.[47]

    On 19 February 2005, a 30-year-old tribal woman Parbati Shabar died of starvation in Amlashol. Her family members stated that the deceased had nothing to eat for a month. But the Belpahari Block Development Officer (BDO) Subhashis Bej claimed that her death was due to illness and not starvation.[48] On 16 April 2005, 42-year-old tribal Lula Shabar died of starvation in Amlashol. According to Lula's nephew Rathu Shabar, Lula cried “bhat dey, bhat dey' (give me rice, give me rice) for three days before he died. But there was virtually nothing to eat in the family. The district administration, however, attributed Lula's death to tuberculosis.[49]

    Tea gardens also witnessed wide-spread hunger. In 2005, about 2000 tea garden workers had been reportedly facing stark starvation ever since the Potong tea estate near the Indo-Nepal boarder under the Mirik block in Darjeeling district was closed down in March 2000 by the Tea Trading Corporation India (TTCI) owned by the central government.[50]

    Ms Anuradha Talwar, adviser to the commissioners of the Supreme Court in West Bengal, in her investigative report submitted to the Supreme Court in September 2005 confirmed deaths of 10 workers at Raipur Tea Estate in Jalpaiguri district between 6 July 2005 and 27 August 2005, including two persons identified as Sunita Suwasi and Phulmani Suwasi who died of starvation. The Supreme Court had appointed Anuradha Talwar to look into matters related to hunger and starvation and to ensure that orders passed by it from time to time were followed. The Raipur Tea Estate had shut down on 17 October 2003 and reopened in March 2005 after an agreement with estate employees that they would work for half the wages. However, the owners abandoned the garden on 5 July 2005. Since then the workers had been left without any work and basic amenities, including food, water and healthcare. On the other hand, the state government failed to introduce Antodaya Anna Yojna rations for the workers. Work under the Swarna Jayanti Rojgar Yojna started only a few days before the team's visit. There was no anganwadi centre for coverage of health of mothers and children and the workers were forced to drink water from the open wells. Employers abandoned the plantation without paying wages and the workers did not get assistance of Rs 500 under the assistance to workers of locked-out industries scheme, despite state government's pledge in the Supreme Court.[51]

    The tea garden workers were denied proper wages. In 18 tea gardens in North Bengal, the workers were owed Rs. 144,842,831.00 as Provident Fund, Rs. 46,206,762.91 as gratuity and Rs. 175,194,059.62 as salary, wages and other benefits by the owners of the tea gardens.[52]

    A survey titled “Nutritional Survey of Tea Workers on Closed, Re-Opened, and Open Tea Plantations of the Dooars Region, West Bengal, India” jointly conducted by Paschim Banga Khet Majoor Samity (West Bengal Agricultural Workers' Association), the International Union of Foodworkers and the American Jewish World Service from August–October 2005 on six tea gardens concluded - “Malnutrition exists on all six gardens surveyed. Even workers on open gardens endure lean periods due to decreased or delayed wage payments and food rations, as well as inconsistently provided benefits that they are due by law. Based on World Health Organization criteria for Body Mass Index, all four open gardens surveyed can be labeled as “starving communities” or “at critical risk for mortality from starvation.” Based on daily caloric intake, 42.5% of the closed garden populations classified as Below Poverty Line (BPL), followed by 40% BPL in sick gardens and 30% BPL in open gardens. All six gardens together, averaged 37% BPL, which is higher than the national average.”[53]

    Denial of starvation deaths by the administration:

    The denial of the State government further compounded the crisis of starvation deaths. The government officials often attributed the deaths to various diseases and old age. On 4 August 2005, a tribal identified as Gantu Shabar died of starvation at Amlashol in West Midnapore. The deceased's wife Pulumoni and other villagers confirmed that Gantu Shabar had died of starvation. But the block development officer Subhashis Bej denied this saying, “We do not know how he [Gantu] died. But we can assure you that there is no shortage of jobs and so there is no reason why one should die of starvation”.[54]

    It was on rare occasion that on 11 November 2005, West Bengal Urban Development and Municipal Affairs Minister Ashok Bhattacharya reportedly admitted that malnutrition existed in several pockets of Naxalbari village in Darjeeling district.[55]

    The government displayed a strong sense of apathy and neglect towards the poor and the helpless citizens. While the rich families enjoyed all comforts and privileges, the starving people were even denied Below Poverty Line status. A poor couple at Biddhannagar colony in Malda district had to sell their child to a neighbour for a token price of 25 paise in April 2005 in order to draw government's attention towards their plight after having been denied a BPL card by the administration.[56]

    In 2005, the government was reportedly providing rotten foodgrains in the name of BPL rations to the lower caste people living in horrendous conditions at the Belgachia garbage dump after they were forcibly evicted by the government from the Bellilious Park in Howrah municipality in Kolkata. The foodgrains provided by the government as BPL rations were reported to be unfit for human consumption.[57] On 11 March 2005, 5-year-old E.M. Lachhmi, daughter of E.M. Parvathi, died of starvation at the Belgachia garbage dump in Kolkata.[58]



    [1]. The Inquiry report is available at http://www.masumindia.org/tribrep.htm

    [2]. Findings of the independent Public Tribunal which investigated into the starvation deaths at Jalangi Subdivsion in Murshidabad district from 23-24 September 2005, http://www.masumindia.org/tribrep.htm

    [3]. 2005 Annual Report of National Crime Records Bureau

    [4]. 2004-2005 Annual Report of NHRC

    [5]. CPI(M) MP, Basu's assistant beaten by police, The Shillong Times, 20 June 2005

    [6]. Maoists kill 3 CPI(M) leaders, The Times of India, 11 July 2005

    [7]. Maoists shoot down CPM man, The Telegraph, 10 October 2005

    [8]. 2005 Annual Report of National Crime Records Bureau

    [9]. Police thrash nurses, The Telegraph, 29 July 2005

    [10]. Boy pick-up probe waits, The Telegraph, 31 October 2005

    [11]. Rights rap on Nadia facilities, The Telegraph, 3 February 2005

    [12]. 2004-2005 Annual Report of NHRC

    [13]. Taken for thief, trader dead in cell, The Telegraph, 17 June 2005

    [14]. Village rage over BSF firing, The Telegraph, 10 February 2005

    [15]. Two killed in police firing, The Sentinel, 5 August 2005

    [16]. Three killed in police firing, The Sentinel, 21 September 2005

    [17]. UA-247-2005: INDIA: Illegal detention and custodial torture by West Bengal Police, Asian Human Rights Commission, 26 December 2005

    [18]. Arrest ends jawan flight, The Telegraph, 11 January 2005

    [19]. Shooter jawan in net, The Telegraph, 5 May 2005

    [20]. BSF trooper kills woman, villagers mob minister, The Times of India, 5 May 2005

    [21]. Judicial remand for jawan, The Statesman, 5 May 2005

    [22]. Police thrash nurses, The Telegraph, 29 July 2005

    [23]. Lathicharge on women, The Telegraph, 30 July 2005

    [24]. Predators on prowl in protector's garb, The Telegraph, 15 August 2005

    [25]. Witch' hacked, The Telegraph, Kolkata, 7 June 2005

    [26]. Couple killed after being branded witches, The Times of India, 15 October 2005

    [27]. Witch-hunting in Kolkata, The Statesman, 17 October 2005

    [28]. ‘Witch' widow punished, The Telegraph, 7 December 2005

    [29]. Boy pick-up probe waits, The Telegraph, 31 October 2005

    [30]. Cop assault on student, The Telegraph, Kolkata, 24 December 2005

    [31]. Court sends rights panel back to girls' home, The Telegraph, 12 March 2005

    [32]. Court glare on girl-selling and police snoring, The Telegraph, 5 September 2005

    [33]. 2004-2005 Annual Report of NHRC

    [34]. Inmate death, The Telegraph, 10 March 2005

    [35]. Scam accused dies in custody, The Telegraph, 9 July 2005

    [36]. Prisoner chokes on food, The Telegraph, 12 July 2005

    [37]. Prisoner chokes on food, The Telegraph, 12 July 2005

    [38]. http://www.westbengalprisons.org/rightsprisons.html

    [39]. Citizens Charter in Prisons of West Bengal, http://www.westbengalprisons.org/rightsprisons.html

    [40]. Rights rap on Nadia facilities, The Telegraph, 3 February 2005

    [41]. Congress, Trinamul walk out of Assembly, The Statesman, 16 March 2005

    [42]. Probe starvation deaths, SC asks panel, The Tribune, 4 June 2005

    [43]. The Inquiry report is available at http://www.masumindia.org/tribrep.htm

    [44]. Murshidabad: Nature's fury, hunger, death, apathy by Zafarul-Islam Khan, The Milli Gazette, 1-15 May 2005, also available at http://www.milligazette.com/dailyupdate/2005/20050501.htm

    [45]. Hungry and Dying in Padma's Lap, Tehelka, 18 June 2005, available at http://www.tehelka.com/story_main12.asp?filename=Ne061805Hungry_and_dying.asp

    [46]. HU-07-2005: UPDATE (India): Starvation deaths continue despite government's commitment to provide food assistance in West Bengal, Asian Human Rights Commission, Hunger Alert, 16 September 2005, http://www.foodjustice.net/ha/mainfile.php/ha2005/67/

    [47]. "The Hunger Game - There is a law against everything, none against starving to death" by Bhaswati Chakravorty, The Telegraph, Kolkata, 26 April 2005

    [48]. Woman dies, family blames hunger - Amlashol death precedes CM visit to hand over houses, The Telegraph, 25 February 2005

    [49]. Starvation stench in Amlashol again, The Telegraph, 21 April 2005

    [50]. Starvation looms over tea workers, The Statesman, 16 July 2005

    [51]. Starvation, finds SC officer, The Telegraph, Kolkata, 21 September 2005

    [52]. Investigative report "Study on Closed and Re-opened Tea Gardens In North Bengal" by Anuradha Talwar, Debasish Chakraborty and Sarmishtha Biswas, available at http://www.iufdocuments.org/www/documents/PKMS-IUFstudy.pdf

    [53]. The report is available at http://www.iufdocuments.org/www/documents/AJWSnutritionreport.
    pdf#search=%22tea%20gardens%20west%20bengal%20hunger%22

    [54]. Starvation stench back in Amlashol, The Telegraph, 11 August 2005

    [55]. Malnutrition points to sting intensity, The Telegraph, 12 November 2005

    [56]. Couple sells son for 25 paise, The Times of India, 10 May 2005

    [57]. HU-05-2005: INDIA: Food provided through government assistance only fit for pigs in West Bengal, Asian Human Rights Commission, Hunger Alert, 5 May 2005, http://www.foodjustice.net/ha/mainfile.php/ha2005/52/

    [58]. HU-02-2005: INDIA: 5 year-old girl, evicted from her home by government authorities, dies of starvation in West Bengal, Asian Human Rights Commission, Hunger Alert, 24 March 2005, http://www.foodjustice.net/ha/mainfile.php/ha2005/42/

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